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Articles selected by Faculty of 1000: the origin of operons; human linkage disequilibrium maps; genomics finds novel secondary metabolites; complex epistasis of fly genes; how did the turtle get its shell?

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    A selection of evaluations from Faculty of 1000 a covering the origin of operons; human linkage disequilibrium maps; genomics finds novel secondary metabolites; complex epistasis of fly genes; how did the turtle get its shell?

    The origin of operons

    The origin and evolution of operons: the piecewise building of the proteobacterial histidine operon. Fani R, Brilli M, Liò P. J Mol Evol 2005, 60:378-390.

    For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#Fani

    Human linkage disequilibrium maps

    The linkage disequilibrium maps of three human chromosomes across four populations reflect their demographic history and a common underlying recombination pattern. De La Vega FM, Isaac H, Collins A, Scafe CR, Halldórsson BV, Su X, Lippert RA, Wang Y, Laig-Webster M, Koehler RT, et al. Genome Res 2005, 15:454-462.

    For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#De

    Genomics finds novel secondary metabolites

    Microbial genomics as a guide to drug discovery and structural elucidation: ECO-02301, a novel antifungal agent, as an example. McAlpine JB, Bachmann BO, Piraee M, Tremblay S, Alarco AM, Zazopoulos E, Farnet CM. J Nat Prod 2005, 68:493-496.

    For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#McAlpine

    Complex epistasis of fly genes

    Flexibility in a gene network affecting a simple behavior in Drosophila melanogaster . van Swinderen B, Greenspan RJ. Genetics 2005, 169:2151-2163.

    For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#Swinderen

    How did the turtle get its shell?

    Comprehensive survey of carapacial ridge-specific genes in turtle implies co-option of some regulatory genes in carapace evolution. Kuraku S, Usuda R, Kuratani S. Evol Dev 2005, 7:3-17.

    For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#Kuraku

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    Articles selected by Faculty of 1000: the origin of operons; human linkage disequilibrium maps; genomics finds novel secondary metabolites; complex epistasis of fly genes; how did the turtle get its shell?. Genome Biol 6, 328 (2005) doi:10.1186/gb-2005-6-6-328

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    Keywords

    • Linkage Disequilibrium
    • Regulatory Gene
    • Histidine
    • Secondary Metabolite
    • Drug Discovery